Profile

Results

We work with you on a personal level to determine the best solutions for your unique needs, then leverage our seasoned expertise to achieve the best possible results.

Relationships

We are your trusted partner in success. Our firm is large enough to offer a full range of professional services at a fair price, but small enough to give you the individual attention that you deserve.

Relief

Rest assured that when a need arises, our firm is ready and capable to handle everything for you so you can focus on what matters most to you.

Items needed to prepare your return:

  1. Your social security numbers and date of births for you, your spouse, and your dependents
  2. Drivers License(s)
  3. Last two years copies of your previous tax return.
  4. All W-2 forms for you and your spouse.
  5. Any 1099’s received.
  6. Proof of health insurance (form 1095’s, Medicare card…)
  7. Bank Account # if you would prefer your refund to be directly deposited.

What is an Enrolled Agent?
Enrolled agents (EAs) are America’s Tax Experts. EAs are the only federally licensed tax practitioners who specialize in taxation and also have unlimited rights to represent taxpayers before the IRS. Enrolled Agent (EA) status is the highest level of certification recognized by the Internal Revenue Service.

What does the term “Enrolled Agent” mean?
“Enrolled” means to be licensed to practice by the federal government, and “agent” means authorized to appear in the place of the taxpayer at the IRS. Only enrolled agents, attorneys, and CPAs have unlimited rights to represent taxpayers before the IRS. The enrolled agent profession dates back to 1884 when, after questionable claims had been presented for Civil War losses, Congress acted to regulate persons who represented citizens in their dealings with the U.S. Treasury Department.

Privilege and the Enrolled Agent
The IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 allow federally authorized practitioners (those bound by the Department of Treasury’s Circular 230 regulations) a limited client privilege. This privilege allows confidentiality between the taxpayer and the enrolled agent under certain conditions. The privilege applies to situations in which the taxpayer is being represented in cases involving audits and collection matters. It is not applicable to the preparation and filing of a tax return. This privilege does not apply to state tax matters, although a number of states have an accountant-client privilege.

Is continuing education required for Enrolled Agents?
In addition to the stringent testing and application process, the IRS requires enrolled agents to complete 72 hours of continuing education, reported every three years, to maintain their enrolled agent status. Because of the expertise necessary to become an enrolled agent and the requirements to maintain the license, there are only about 46,000 practicing enrolled agents.